The Encyclopedia of Social Sciences provides a comprehensive reference work covering the following disciplines and subdisciplines in the Social Sciences, highlighting Economics, Finance, Business, and Other Social Sciences, with each chapter having a designated Editor with expertise across a wide range of subdisciplines:

Chapter 1: Economic Theory and Econometrics
Edited by Michael McAleer

Coverage includes: Economic Theory, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Econometrics and Statistics, Mathematical Economics, Organizational Economics.

Chapter 2: Finance
Edited by Chia-Lin Chang

Coverage includes: Investment Finance, Risk and Volatility, Corporate Finance, Behavioral Finance, Energy Finance, Industrial Organization, Health Economics.

Chapter 3: Business
Edited by Philip Hans Franses

Coverage includes: Accounting, Marketing Science, Management Science, Behavioral Science, Administrative Science, Decision Sciences, Public Policy, Tourism and Hospitality.

Chapter 4: Other Social Sciences
Editor yet to be chosen

Coverage includes: Political Science, Social Psychology, Sociology, Education, Law, Library and Information Science.

Published Entries

Social, Cultural, and Economic Determinants of Well-Being
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Individual well-being is influenced by a number of economic and social factors that include income, mental health, physical health, education, social relationships, employment, discrimination, government policies, and neighborhood conditions. Well-being involves both ph [...] Read more
Individual well-being is influenced by a number of economic and social factors that include income, mental health, physical health, education, social relationships, employment, discrimination, government policies, and neighborhood conditions. Well-being involves both physical and mental health as part of a holistic approach to health promotion and disease prevention. The well-being of a society’s people has the potential to impact the well-being and productivity of the society as a whole. Though it may be assessed at the individual level, well-being becomes an important population outcome at the macro level and therefore represents a public health issue. 
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Organizational Justice: Typology, Antecedents and Consequences
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Organizational Justice is an individual’s perception that events, actions, or decisions within an organization adhere to a standard of fairness. Justice researchers have categorized justice into four types, differentiated by how fairness is evaluated by employees: [...] Read more
Organizational Justice is an individual’s perception that events, actions, or decisions within an organization adhere to a standard of fairness. Justice researchers have categorized justice into four types, differentiated by how fairness is evaluated by employees: distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice. Organizational justice perceptions have consequences for the employee and the organization: increasing job satisfaction, commitment, and trust; and decreasing turnover, counterproductive work behaviors, and even workplace violence. Contemporary organizational justice research seeks to understand how to restore justice after an injustice has occurred. 
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Unveiling Neuromarketing and Its Research Methodology
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Neuromarketing is the union of cognitive psychology, which studies mental processes, neurology and neurophysiology, which study the functioning and responses of the brain and body physiology to external stimuli, and marketing, which studies valuable exchanges, to explai [...] Read more
Neuromarketing is the union of cognitive psychology, which studies mental processes, neurology and neurophysiology, which study the functioning and responses of the brain and body physiology to external stimuli, and marketing, which studies valuable exchanges, to explain marketing effects on customers’ and consumers’ behaviours and on buying and decision processes. It includes a set of research techniques that, by observing and evaluating how the brain and other body parts respond, avoids possible biases and provides truthful and objective information on consumer subconscious. The term “consumer neuroscience” covers academic approaches using techniques such as fMRI, Eye Tracking, or EED. The objectives of this entry are to show what neuromarketing is and what added value it brings to the study of consumer behaviour and purchase decision processes. The conclusions show a favourable future and positive attitudes towards neuromarketing.
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Michael McAleer

Institution: Department of Finance, College of Management, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan

Interests: economics, financial econometrics, quantitative finance, risk and financial management, econometrics, statistics, time series analysis, energy economics and finance, sustainability, environmental modelling, carbon emissions, climate change econometrics, forecasting, informatics, and data mining

Chia-Lin Chang

Institution: Department of Applied Economics and Department of Finance, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan

Interests: economics; econometrics; financial econometrics; statistics; quantitative finance; risk and financial management; energy economics and finance; applied time series analysis; forecasting; technology and innovation; industrial organization; health and medical economics; tourism research and management

Philip Hans Franses

Institution: Department of Econometrics, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, PO Box 1738 3000 DR, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Interests: economics; econometrics; statistics; time series analysis; forecasting, marketing research; marketing