Topic Review
Cepheus
Cepheus is a northern constellation named after the mythical king of Aethiopia in Greek mythology. Positioned in the celestial northern hemisphere, it is recognizable for its distinctive shape resembling a house with a peaked roof. Cepheus is home to several notable deep-sky objects, including the famous variable star Delta Cephei, which gave its name to a class of pulsating stars known as Cepheid variables.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Centaurus
Centaurus, a prominent southern hemisphere constellation, is one of the largest and most recognizable constellations in the night sky. Named after the centaur Chiron from Greek mythology, Centaurus features the bright Alpha Centauri system, one of the closest star systems to Earth.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Cassiopeia
Cassiopeia, named after the queen in Greek mythology, is a prominent constellation in the northern celestial hemisphere. Known for its distinctive "W" or "M" shape, depending on its orientation in the sky, Cassiopeia is easily recognizable and has been a subject of fascination for astronomers and stargazers throughout history.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Carina
Carina, Latin for "the keel" or "the hull," is a constellation in the southern celestial hemisphere. Representing the keel of the mythical ship Argo Navis, Carina is home to several notable celestial objects, including the second-brightest star in the night sky, Canopus. It is rich in nebulae, star clusters, and other deep-sky wonders.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Capricornus
Capricornus, often depicted as a sea-goat in mythology, is a zodiac constellation located in the southern celestial hemisphere. Its name is derived from the Latin words "capra," meaning goat, and "cornu," meaning horn. Capricornus is notable for containing several bright stars and is associated with the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Canis Minor
Canis Minor, Latin for "Lesser Dog," is a small constellation in the northern celestial hemisphere. Named for one of the hunting dogs of Orion in Greek mythology, Canis Minor is characterized by its two brightest stars, Procyon and Gomeisa, which shine brightly in the night sky. 
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Canis Major
Canis Major, Latin for "Greater Dog," is one of the most prominent constellations in the southern celestial hemisphere. Often depicted as one of Orion's hunting dogs in Greek mythology, Canis Major is best known for its brightest star, Sirius, also called the Dog Star, which is the brightest star in the night sky. With its distinctive shape and rich cultural significance, Canis Major has fascinated astronomers and storytellers throughout history.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Canes Venatici
Canes Venatici, Latin for "hunting dogs," is a small northern constellation situated between Ursa Major and Boötes. It was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century, representing the hunting dogs of Boötes, the Herdsman. The constellation is notable for hosting several interesting celestial objects, including the famous Whirlpool Galaxy (M51) and the Sunflower Galaxy (M63).
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Cancer (Constellation)
Cancer, recognized as one of the twelve zodiac constellations, is situated in the northern celestial hemisphere. Named after the Latin word for crab, Cancer is associated with the Greek myth of the crab sent by Hera to distract Hercules during his battle with the Hydra.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
Topic Review
Camelopardalis
Camelopardalis, recognized by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), is a constellation located in the northern celestial hemisphere. Its name is derived from the Latin word for "giraffe," reflecting its association with this graceful and majestic creature.
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  • 29 Feb 2024
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