ZEMCH is an acronym of zero energy mass custom home that reflects socially, economically, environmentally, and humanly sustainable built environments that have been applied to developed and developing countries. Today's sociodemographic changes are leading to the emergence of non-traditional households and societal shifts are affecting housing design in regard to configuration, functionality, and ornamentation. Customisation and personalisation of the built environment can be considered as a means to help accommodate such diversity over the building’s lifespan. A house is a system of both energy and environment. Thus, it also has an impact on the consequences of climate change. The mass production of zero energy homes in the global context, may help to build a positive pathway towards changing the tide of climate change. Nevertheless, housing affordability is a prominent issue around the globe, and the volume of delivery of high-performance low-cost homes may contribute to this alleviation.

This first volume embraces these sustainable housing delivery challenges by encompassing a wide spectrum of theoretical and pragmatic design, production, communication, and marketing strategies, as well as educational attempts within the context of ZEMCH R&D activities.

Open for Submissions

To check suitability, we ask authors to submit a short abstract to Dr. Masa Noguchi (masa.noguchi@unimelb.edu.au) in advance. The Abstract Submission Deadline is 30th June 2022. You may send your abstract/manuscript now or at any time up until the deadline. Submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. 

Please read and follow the items below:

  1. use the Microsoft Word Template and the Manuscript Preparation Guideline to prepare your manuscript (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/encyclopedia/instructions);
    2. make sure that issues regarding publication ethics, copyright, authorship, figure formats, data and references format have been appropriately considered;
    3. ensure that all authors have approved the content of the submitted manuscript.

For more information about this book:

Encyclopedia of ZEMCH Research and Development

Published Entries

Bagnoli Urban Regeneration through Phytoremediation
By ,
The Bagnolidistrict in Naples has needed urban redevelopmentfor many years. The area is not only affected by pollution caused by many industries but also by environmental pollutants, according togeognostic surveys that have found numerous contaminantsin the subsoil and [...] Read more
The Bagnolidistrict in Naples has needed urban redevelopmentfor many years. The area is not only affected by pollution caused by many industries but also by environmental pollutants, according togeognostic surveys that have found numerous contaminantsin the subsoil and water.Currently, the combination of an urban rehabilitation processwith the phytodepuration technique may represent a successful idea for obtaining bothurban regenerationand environmental remediation. Phytoremediation, a biologically based technology, has attracted the attention of both thepublic and scientists as a low-cost alternative for soil requalification. The use of plants as well as the microorganisms present in their root systems plays an important role in the ecological engineering field in controlling and reducing pollutants present in theair, water and soil.The result is efficient, sustainable and cost-effective environmental recovery compared to conventional chemical–physical techniques. In this way, not only the environmental recovery of SIN Bagnoli-Corogliocan be obtained, but also the regeneration of its landscape.
Flod
Cottage Culture in Finland: Development and Perspectives
By ,
This entry provides an understanding of the past, present, and future of the Finnish cottage culture to create an overall picture of its development trajectory and its terminology, e.g., villa, in this context denoting a second home. Convenient, ready-made solutions, ea [...] Read more
This entry provides an understanding of the past, present, and future of the Finnish cottage culture to create an overall picture of its development trajectory and its terminology, e.g., villa, in this context denoting a second home. Convenient, ready-made solutions, easy maintenance, a high level of equipment, year-round use, location, and modern and simple architectural styles are important selection criteria for (summer) cottages that belonged only to the wealthy bourgeois class in the 19th century and have taken their present form with a major transformation in Finland since then. Additionally, municipal regulations and increased attention to ecological concerns are other important issues regarding the cottage today. Cottage inheritance has changed over the generations, and the tightening of building regulations and increased environmental awareness are key drivers of the future transformation of cottage culture. Moreover, the increasing demand for single-family and outdoor spaces created by social changes such as remote working, which has become widespread with the COVID-19 pandemic, will make the summer cottage lifestyle even more popular in Finland. It is thought that this entry will contribute to the continuance of the Finnish cottage culture, which is essential for the vitality of countryside municipalities, local development, national culture, and the well-being of Finnish people. 
Flod
Conductive Heat Transfer in Thermal Bridges
By
A thermal bridge is a component of a building that is characterized by a higher thermal loss compared with its surroundings. Their accurate modeling is a key step in energy performance analysis due to the increased awareness of the importance of sustainable design. Ther [...] Read more
A thermal bridge is a component of a building that is characterized by a higher thermal loss compared with its surroundings. Their accurate modeling is a key step in energy performance analysis due to the increased awareness of the importance of sustainable design. Thermal modeling in architecture and engineering is often not carried out volumetrically, thereby sacrificing accuracy for complex geometries, whereas numerical textbooks often give the finite element method in much higher generality than required, or only treat the case of uniform materials. Despite thermal modeling traditionally belonging exclusively to the engineer’s toolbox, computational and parametric design can often benefit from understanding the key steps of finite element thermal modeling, in order to inform a real-time design feedback loop. In this entry, these gaps are filled and the reader is introduced to all relevant physical and computational notions and methods necessary to understand and compute the stationary energy dissipation and thermal conductance of thermal bridges composed of materials in complex geometries. The overview is a self-contained and coherent expository, and both physically and mathematically as correct as possible, but intuitive and accessible to all audiences. Details for a typical example of an insulated I-beam thermal bridge are provided.
Flod
Masa Noguchi

Institution: Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia

Interests: zero energy mass customised housing; low carbon emission sustainable community development; design engineering; ZEMCH Network

Antonio Frattari

Institution: Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, 38123 Trento, Italy

Interests: building automation; ecological design; universal design; smart home; vernacular architecture; wooden architecture; life cycle assessment

Carlos Formoso

Institution: Building Innovation Research Unit (NORIE), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 90040-060, Brazil

Interests: mass customisation; lean construction; design management; BIM; social housing development; healthcare projects

Haşim Altan

Institution: Department of Architecture, Faculty of Design, Arkin University of Creative Arts and Design, Girne 9935, Cyprus

Interests: building performance and simulation; indoor environmental quality; passive design; sustainable architecture; architectural engineering; urban regeneration; building information modelling; healthy buildings

John Onyango

Institution: Department of Architectural Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan 31080, Korea

Interests: photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T); building-integrated PV/T (BIPVT); zero energy buildings; vaccuum insulation panel (VIP)

Jun-Tae Kim

Institution: Department of Architectural Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan 31080, Korea

Interests: photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T); building-integrated PV/T (BIPVT); zero energy buildings; vaccuum insulation panel (VIP)

Kheira Anissa Tabet Aoul

Institution: Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain PO Box 15551, United Arab Emirates

Interests: carbon neutral design; building performance under extreme hot climate; energy performance; daylighting; environmental experience design; sustainability and human factors in the built environment

Mehdi Amirkhani

Institution: UniSA Online, Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Interests: retrofitting; renewable energy; innovative technology; indoor environmental comfort; lighting system; sustainability planning; architectural design

Sara Wilkinson

Institution: School of Built Environment, Faculty of Desgin Architecture & Building, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia

Interests: building sustainability; retrofit; adaptive reuse

Shaila Bantanur

Institution: Department of Architecture, BMS School of Architecture, Bengaluru 560064, India

Interests: traditional housing; socio-economic sustainability; sustainable built environment; habitat design; building performance evaluation; energy efficient building