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Topic review
Updated time: 31 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Julia Sowińska-Heim
Definition: Significant architectural and historical monuments become an important point of reference for the local population, increasing their sense of security, and act as a factor shaping social identity. An effort to preserve relevant objects in a city is therefore important both for retaining its unique features and for strengthening the local community. A significant role plays here the adaptive reuse of architectural heritage, which allows for the preservation of architectural objects that are important to the local community, promoting the integrity and historical continuity of the city while restoring the objects’ functional and economic value. The introduction of a new function in architectural heritage is not only an important impulse for the tangible regeneration of urban tissue, but can also help to reconstruct the image and identity of a city. The local cultural and architectural heritage plays a significant role in the process leading to the creation of positive references and elimination of negative connotations related to an economic or social crisis. These remain an important part of the history of a city and, at the same time, its significance may be reimagined and shown in a new context, that relates to the present day. As a result, artefacts of the past gain new meanings, which are subject to a different, contemporary interpretation through the prism of current needs and ideas. Objects or even groups of objects from the past are being consciously taken into consideration in the activities currently undertaken. The contemporary scale of the phenomenon and complexity of the issues concerning the adaptive reuse of architectural heritage are a consequence of the multi-faceted transformations that have taken place in recent decades in the social, cultural and economic spheres, and, consequently, the contemporary understanding of the role and significance of the architectural heritage.
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Topic review
Updated time: 23 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Sang-Eun Byun
Definition: A growing emphasis on stakeholder values of social and environmental responsibility and the triple bottom line (TBL) thinking led to the emergence of B Corporations (hereafter B Corps). B Corps are social enterprises that are committed to the TBL and certified by B Lab, a non-profit organization that assesses corporations’ overall impact of their decisions on their workers, customers, community, and the environment. Although B Corps serves as a catalyst for sustainable development, little is known about how they communicate on social media during a crisis. In this study, we examined the social media communications of B Corps to (1) identify salient topics and themes, (2) analyze how these themes align with the TBL, and (3) evaluate social media performance against industry benchmarks. We focused on the apparel, footwear, and accessories (AFA) sectors in the U.S. and chose Twitter, a platform known for crisis communication. Using a qualitative method, we found four topics and 21 underlying themes. Topics related to social/environmental issues and COVID-19 were most dominant, followed by product/brand promotions. Further classification of specific themes and cases from a TBL perspective demonstrated that, overall, B Corps in the AFA sectors leveraged various approaches to promote balance between each TBL dimension. Lastly, although collectively B Corps exceeded some of the Twitter industry benchmarks, at an individual level, most brands had room for improvement to build a stronger community and promote synergy among the three pillars of the TBL.
Entry Collection : COVID-19
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Topic review
Updated time: 19 Jul 2021
Submitted by: Joash Mageto
Definition: Sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) has received much attention in the decade ending in 2020 due to an increased awareness of climate change and environmental and social issues across the globe. SSCM requires firms across a supply chain to report not only on profits but also on environmental and social performance. SSCM can be improved by utilizing big data analytics, as such, the paper investigated how big data analytics can be used to enhance SSCM practices in manufacturing supply chains
Topic review
Updated time: 06 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Mirko Locatelli
Definition: Information Modelling and Management (IMM) methods for Most Economically Advantageous Tender (MEAT) can promote the adoption of environmentally sustainable practices. Despite the wide regulatory framework and existing drivers, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) trend is still upward. The literature review regarding IMM and CDW management implementation during the design phases is mainly focused on studies and applications from the designer and contractor’s points of view, although few studies focused on Green Public Procurement (GPP) and CDW management integration from the Public Client’s point of view. This research aims at investigating the integration and efficiency of MEAT and IMM to promote the application of sustainable strategies focused on waste reduction and resource valorization. The study investigates the Public Client’s role in promoting sustainable practices, introducing digital material inventory and BIM during the design phases, and including environmental award criteria in the call for tender documents. A Design Build (DB) procurement model is considered in the case study of a brownfield renovation and the construction of a new school in northern Italy. The methodology provided the Public Client with a replicable method to evaluate the environmental impact of the bids, allowing for proper selective demolition planning, CDW decrease, and organization while promoting their integration in companies’ expertise and procedures.
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Topic review
Updated time: 05 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Mahdi Salehi
Definition: Firm value relies considerably on intellectual capital. As a reliable source of sustainable competitive advantage, intellectual capital can lead a firm to economic growth and technological development. As the mainstream of intangible assets, it is expected that the application of intellectual capital plays a critical role in developing sustainable competitive advantages for companies. Intellectual capital is a vital intangible asset to a business, especially in high-tech industries. A considerable part of organizational knowledge is embodied in the board’s intellectual capital, contributing significantly to the board’s decision-making. The board’s intellectual capital should be managed appropriately to create value for a company even in unpredictable economies, increase competitive advantages, and stabilize profitability.
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Topic review
Updated time: 03 Nov 2020
Submitted by: Xiaoting Chi
Definition: Tourism destination competitiveness reflecting the generic characteristics should be considered diversified to notice the distinctive perspective between the business environment and competitive advantages. Criticism of some prior conventional literature stems from the lack of a rigorous process to find the structure and attributes of the measurement items for a destination’s business environment and competitive advantages. The available theoretical framework and measures containing the destination business environment and competitive advantages warrant further investigation. The vital dimensions of the destination business environment (i.e., dynamism,hostility,turbulence,investment,information technology,and governance) and destination competitive advantages (i.e., defensiveness, local acceptance, accessibility, reasonability, uniqueness, supportiveness, and image sustainability) were successfully identified through quantitative and empirical analysis, which could provide a significant basis for managerial and policy decisions in the tourism industry.
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Topic review
Updated time: 27 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Jun Yang
Definition: In management research, CEO power refers to the power that can override objections to influence key decision outcomes within the company. This power can be obtained in formal or informal ways.
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Biography
Updated time: 10 Nov 2020
Submitted by: Chia-Lin Chang
Abstract: Chia-Lin Chang PhD (Economics), Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium Current Appointments University Distinguished Professor, Professor of Economics, Professor of Finance, Director of the Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Centre (ANRRC),National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Faculty of Economic and Financial Sciences, University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Adjunct Professor, Department of Quantitative Economics, Complutense University of Madrid (founded 1293), Spain; Adjunct Chair Professor, Asia University, Taiwan. Distinctions Elected Fellow (FMSSANZ), Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand (FMSSANZ) Biennial Medalist, MSSANZ, 2015 Elected Distinguished Fellow (DFIETI), International Engineering and Technology Institute (IETI) Annual Scientific Award, IETI, 2017
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Topic review
Updated time: 01 May 2021
Submitted by: John Rincon-Moreno
Definition: Defining the circular economy (CE) as a material and energy model coincides with the definition given by multiple authors in which Industrial Symbiosis (IS) has been deemed as a foundational strategy to support the implementation of the CE. The consumption of secondary materials is essential to achieve a successful transformation from a linear economy to a CE focused on IS practices. In this scenario, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) play a major role as stakeholders in developing CE systems as it is not possible to create this model with each company working in isolation.
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Topic review
Updated time: 28 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Todor Tagarev
Definition: The requirements to the governance of collaborative networked organisations (CNOs) can be structured in 33 categories: Geographical Representation or exclusion; Supply chain security; Involvement of external stakeholders; Standards and methodologies; Representation on senior governance bodies; Decision making principles; Auditing; Dispute/conflict management arrangements; Confidentiality & Security; IPR management; Ethics code; Use of slave labour or labour of minors; Green policies; Gender policies and representation; Transparency; Accountability ; Anti-corruption/ integrity policies; Innovation; Adaptiveness; Cohesion; Trust; Sustainability; Resilience; Communication and engagement; Knowledge management; Long-term perspective on collaboration; Interoperability; Leadership; Organisational culture; Competences; Risk management; Evidence-based decision-making; and Competitiveness. As a result of a comprehensive study for CNOs in the field of cybersecurity these governance issues have been structured in two groups (of governance objectives and CNO features) and four tiers in terms of priority. While the governance categories are universally applicable, their prioritisation is relevant for CNOs in the field of cybersecurity.
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