Topic Review
List of Kakapo
There are fewer than 250 living individuals of the critically endangered kakapo, a large, flightless parrot native to New Zealand. Every known living kakapo, except some young chicks, has been given a name by officials of the Kakapo Recovery Programme. Many of the older birds were given English-language names, but more recent chicks have been given Māori names. Some kakapo, such as Richard Henry and Moorhouse, are named after people who have provided assistance to the preservation efforts. A kakapo interactive family tree is available.
  • 8
  • 01 Dec 2022
Topic Review
East African Lion
The East African lion is a Panthera leo melanochaita population in East Africa. During the 20th century, lion populations in this part of Africa became fragmented and declined in several range countries due to loss of habitat and prey base, poaching and killing of lions to protect livestock and human life. In 2005, a Lion Conservation Strategy was developed for East and Southern Africa. Today, lion populations are stable only in large protected area complexes. The scientific name P. l. melanochaita was proposed for the Cape lion in 1842 that was eradicated in the mid-19th century. P. l. melanochaita differs genetically from P. leo leo; the two subspecies probably diverged at least 50,000 years ago.
  • 7
  • 01 Dec 2022
Topic Review
American Sparrow
American sparrows are a group of mainly New World passerine birds, forming the family Passerellidae. American sparrows are seed-eating birds with conical bills, brown or gray in color, and many species have distinctive head patterns. Although they share the name sparrow, American sparrows are more closely related to Old World buntings than they are to the Old World sparrows (family Passeridae). American sparrows are also similar in both appearance and habit to finches, with which they sometimes used to be classified.
  • 17
  • 28 Nov 2022
Topic Review
List of Canis Species and Subspecies
Canis, the genus of mammals commonly known as wolves, dingos, dogs, coyotes, and jackals, contains several living species, many divided into numerous subspecies, as well as numerous recently extinct and extinct prehistoric species. Domestic dogs are not usually granted taxonomic variety names below the level of either their species name, or subspecies name so they do not appear here with their popular breed names as individual entries. The New Guinea singing dog and any other varieties of subspecies appear as individual entries here when their taxonomic considerations now suggest that they are varieties of subspecies other than domestic dogs, such as of dingoes. References for taxonomic classification, issues, and current considerations, especially in light of DNA revelations year to year, are found in the articles on individual canids; as this article is only a list, the extensive literature and specifics of these issues for each canid are beyond the scope of reference notes here. Furthermore, articles on the species in this list's section headings, and details of their evolutionary, divergent, interbreeding, geolocational and human-culture mediated shifts contain references on which this list relies when including and positioning its entries. References to this article are thus of two sorts, those pertaining to wholesale sourcing of entries, especially those that do not yet have their own Wikipedia articles, and the far more extensive references in existing Wikipedia articles for each entry, header species, and other relevant taxon.
  • 21
  • 22 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Glossary of Bird Terms
The following is a glossary of common English language terms used in the description of birds—warm-blooded vertebrates of the class Aves and the only living dinosaurs, characterized by feathers, the ability to fly in all but the approximately 60 extant species of flightless birds, toothless, beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Among other details such as size, proportions and shape, terms defining bird features developed and are used to describe features unique to the class—especially evolutionary adaptations that developed to aid flight. There are, for example, numerous terms describing the complex structural makeup of feathers (e.g., barbules, rachides and vanes); types of feathers (e.g., filoplume, pennaceous and plumulaceous feathers); and their growth and loss (e.g., colour morph, nuptial plumage and pterylosis). There are thousands of terms that are unique to the study of birds. This glossary makes no attempt to cover them all, concentrating on terms that might be found across descriptions of multiple bird species by bird enthusiasts and ornithologists. Though words that are not unique to birds are also covered, such as "back" or "belly", they are defined in relation to other unique features of external bird anatomy, sometimes called "topography". As a rule, this glossary does not contain individual entries on any of the approximately 9,700 recognized living individual bird species of the world.
  • 213
  • 09 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Coypu
The coypu (from spa coipú, from arn koypu; Myocastor coypus), also known as the nutria, is a large, herbivorous, semiaquatic rodent. Classified for a long time as the only member of the family Myocastoridae, Myocastor is now included within Echimyidae, the family of the spiny rats. The coypu lives in burrows alongside stretches of water, and feeds on river plant stems. Originally native to subtropical and temperate South America, it has since been introduced to North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa, primarily by fur farmers. Although it is still hunted and trapped for its fur in some regions, its destructive burrowing and feeding habits often bring it into conflict with humans, and it is considered an invasive species.
  • 52
  • 04 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Ophrysia
The Himalayan quail (Ophrysia superciliosa) or mountain quail, is a medium-sized quail belonging to the pheasant family. It was last reported in 1876 and is feared extinct. This species was known from only 2 locations (and 12 specimens) in the western Himalayas in Uttarakhand, north-west India . The last verifiable record was in 1876 near the hill station of Mussoorie.
  • 26
  • 02 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Japanese River Otter
The Japanese river otter (Japanese: ニホンカワウソ(日本川獺 ー, Hepburn: Nihon-kawauso) (Lutra lutra whiteleyi) is an extinct variety of otter formerly widespread in Japan. Dating back to the 1880s, it was even seen in Tokyo. The population suddenly shrank in the 1930s, and the mammal nearly vanished. Since then, it has only been spotted several times, in 1964 in the Seto Inland Sea, and in the Uwa Sea in 1972 and 1973. The last official sighting was in the southern part of Kōchi Prefecture in 1979, when it was photographed in the mouth of the Shinjo River in Susaki. It was subsequently classified as a "Critically Endangered" species on the Japanese Red List. On August 28, 2012, the Japanese river otter was officially declared extinct by the Ministry of the Environment. It is the official animal symbol of Ehime Prefecture. In February 2017, a wild otter was caught on camera on Tsushima Island, Nagasaki Prefecture. However, it is not known whether the observed otter was a Japanese river otter.
  • 50
  • 18 Oct 2022
Topic Review
Southern African Lion
The Southern African lion is a Panthera leo melanochaita population in Southern Africa. During the 20th century, lion populations in this part of Africa became fragmented and declined in several range countries due to loss of habitat and prey base, poaching and killing of lions to protect livestock and human life. In 2005, a Lion Conservation Strategy was developed for Southern and East Africa. Today, lion populations are stable only in large protected area complexes. In intensively managed protected areas in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe, they increased since the turn of this century. The scientific name P. l. melanochaita was proposed for the Cape lion in 1842 that was eradicated in the mid-19th century. P. l. melanochaita differs genetically from P. leo leo; the two subspecies probably diverged at least 50,000 years ago.
  • 39
  • 18 Oct 2022
Topic Review
Ring-Tailed Cat
The ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a mammal of the raccoon family native to arid regions of North America. It is widely distributed and well adapted to disturbed areas. It has been legally trapped for its fur. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. It is also known as the ringtail cat, ring-tailed cat, miner's cat or bassarisk, and is sometimes called a cacomistle, though this term seems to be more often used to refer to Bassariscus sumichrasti.
  • 39
  • 14 Oct 2022
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