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Braverman, E.; Dennen, C. Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History. Encyclopedia. Available online: https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/15828 (accessed on 14 June 2024).
Braverman E, Dennen C. Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History. Encyclopedia. Available at: https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/15828. Accessed June 14, 2024.
Braverman, Eric, Catherine Dennen. "Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History" Encyclopedia, https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/15828 (accessed June 14, 2024).
Braverman, E., & Dennen, C. (2021, November 09). Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History. In Encyclopedia. https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/15828
Braverman, Eric and Catherine Dennen. "Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History." Encyclopedia. Web. 09 November, 2021.
Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History
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In the outpatient general practice setting, most practitioners do not have the time or resources to acquire a comprehensive history pertaining to patients' brain and mental health. This comprehensive brain-mind health history gives health care providers a simple and easy-to-use checklist, which can be filled out by patients before their appointment and/or while sitting in the waiting room. This will allow practitioners to have a more thorough and detailed history of their patients on hand, which they can quickly skim through as needed. In addition, it will help practitioners introduce and subsequently discuss more sensitive topics with their patients that are often associated with stigmas, such as substance use, mental health issues, etc. Ultimately, this comprehensive history will allow health care practitioners to make better decisions on behalf of their patients.

Memory Attention Neuropsychiatric ADHD Concussion Head Trauma Neurotransmitters Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History Mood Insurance Codes

A Brain Health Check-Up

     Cognitive impairment is an extremely common public health issue that is all too often overlooked.  When discussing cognitive impairment most primary care physicians all agree that assessments of cognitive function are valuable tools and vital to patient welfare.  However, only about 16% of adults over the age of 65 receive regular routine cognitive assessments, which is dramatically less than other preventive screening tests such as, blood pressure (91%), cholesterol (83%), and diabetes (66%)[1].  Furthermore, the majority of patients who do receive regular cognitive assessments are typically above the age of 50, but cognitive dysfunction can be seen in all ages including the young. 

     Psychiatric illness is one of the most prevalent causes of cognitive impairment in those under 50.  In 2019 approximately 51.5 million adults (age 18 or older) in the United States suffered from mental illness and the highest prevalence rate was seen in young adults (age 18-25)[2]. Routine cognitive assessments would be a valuable tool in identifying and beginning the management of mental illnesses earlier, which would, in turn, provide these individuals with a better quality of life.  However, screening for any form of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) isn’t very common in general and even less so in those under 50.  This further exemplifies the under usage of an important health assessment tool and identifies an area of improvement that is desperately needed within our health care system.

     In addition, another challenge that health care providers can face is that patients can be reluctant to discuss any perceived changes in their cognitive function, including memory, attention, confusion, etc.  According to the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) Healthy Aging Data (2015-2019), on average less than half of adults aged 50 years and older with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) reported discussing noticed changes in their cognitive function with a health care professional[3].  A streamlined screening test would not only give health care professionals an opportunity to open a dialogue with their patients, but it would also allow for the identification and subsequent discussion of cognitive impairments without embarrassment.

     One solution to this problem would be to implement in the United States (US) an annual routine brain health checkup exam, for all ages, in every aspect of health care.  This would not only allow health professionals to identify and diagnose cognitive impairment earlier, but it would also help establish a baseline for their patients in terms of cognitive function.  The best comparison of a patient’s cognitive function is to themselves while in a healthy state, so knowing a patient’s baseline cognitive function would provide physicians with invaluable information.  With an established baseline and routine brain health checkups, physicians would be able to detect changes in cognitive function much quicker, which would allow them to diagnose and start treatments sooner.  Finally, an annual brain health checkup exam would help prevent further deterioration of the mind in the general population, while saving the country millions in related health care costs each year.

     This paper includes several detailed checklists, involving brain-mind health, that could be used routinely in an outpatient primary care setting. This would allow primary care physicians to obtain a more thorough and detailed history of their patients in a very efficient manner and subsequently provide better care for their patients.

A Comprehensive Brain Mind Health History

     A combined, comprehensive, one-page brain-mind health history is included below. This would provide practitioners with a short and simple document that patients could fill out prior to their appointment whether at home or in the waiting room. This would ensure providers that they had a very thorough detailed history of their patient, which they could quickly read through before seeing the patient or while talking to them. In addition, this helps the patient recall issues they might have otherwise forgotten, or thought was not medically relevant. This would also help providers address more sensitive topics or issues that are often associated with stigmas, such as substance use, mental health issues, etc. Overall, it helps practitioners provide the best possible care for patients.

Neurotransmitter Imbalances©

     Neurotransmitters are the origin of brain bioelectricity. There are four core families of neurotransmitter systems including, dopamine/catecholamines, acetylcholine, GABA/glutamate, and serotonin. When these neurotransmitters are not balanced, they can cause significant and persistent brain-mind health disturbances. The Neurotransmitter imbalances checklist below lists common symptoms associated with specific neurotransmitter deficiencies. This allows patients to better understand at the chemical level why they are experiencing certain symptoms/disorders and allows treatment to be tailored towards their specific needs. In addition, the checklist offers further value because even individuals who are not seriously ill often have areas within their life that they can or want to improve upon and this list provides them the means to do so. Therefore, the neurotransmitter imbalances checklist not only helps guide health providers in the treatment of memory, attention, and neuropsychiatric problems but also enables individuals to improve upon themselves and their daily life.

Neurotransmitter Imbalance/Deficiency Checklist

Directions: Put a checkmark next to each problem that applies to you NOW. Put a "P" next to each one that has applied to you in the PAST.

Dopamine

Symptoms of Deficiency

Acetylcholine

Symptoms of Deficiency

GABA

Symptoms of Deficiency

GABA

Symptoms continued…

Serotonin

Symptoms of Deficiency

Poor concentration

Memory loss

Anxiety

Dizziness

Sleep disorder

Constipation

Thinking problems

Trembling

Unusual allergies

Carbohydrate craving

Low sex drive

Learning problems

Twitching

Chest pain or discomfort

PMS

Difficulty achieving orgasm

Sexual dysfunction

Feeling shaky

Restlessness

Hypertension

Impotence

Dyslexia

Feelings of dread

Rage

Arthritis

Obesity

Inflammatory disorders

Backache

Short temper

Constipation

Slow or rigid movements

Arthritis

Headache

Muscle tension/aches

Allergies

Lack of quickness

Diabetes

Difficulty concentrating

Phobias/fears

Nausea

Shuffling gait

Glaucoma

Shortness of breath

Cough/choking

Vomiting

Wide based gait

Eye disorders

Hyperventilation

Fear of dying

Insomnia

Poor walking

Cholesterol elevation

Hypervigilance

Strange thoughts or pains

Depression

Poor physical strength

Myasthenia gravis

Fatigability

Blurred vision

Memory loss

Poor blood sugar stability

Multiple sclerosis

Abnormal sense of smell

High startle responses

Weight gain

Slow metabolism

Osteoporosis

Hyperactivity

Tinnitus (ringing in ears)

Shyness

Hypoglycemia

Difficulty visualizing

Decreased libido

Seizures

Self-absorbed

Diabetes

Difficulty concentrating

Sexual dysfunction

Muscle loss

Masochistic

Mood swings

Difficulty remembering

Flushing and pallor

Manic depression

Drama queen

Anger

Loss of immediate memory

Difficulty swallowing

Mood swings

"Blues"

High blood pressure

Poor attention

"Lump in throat"

Chronic pain

Drug and alcohol addiction

Nicotine cravings

Rulebreaker

Tachycardia

Carbohydrate cravings

Thought confusion

Sugar cravings

Drama queen

Palpitations

Depression

Co-dependency

Depression

Bipolar

Butterflies in stomach

High blood pressure

Lack of pleasure

Inability to gain weight

Lack of idealism

Sweating

Constipation

Lack of common sense

Inability to lose weight

Lack of creative IQ

Sleep disorders

Protein cravings

Lack of artistic appreciation

Slow processing speed

Omissions

Cold/clammy hands

Nausea

Slow reaction time

Attention-deficit

Irrational

Diarrhea

Vomiting

Loner

Narcolepsy

“Blank-out”

attention problems

Hypersomnia/insomnia

Cardiac arrhythmias

Perfectionist

Excessive sleep

Dry mouth (xerostomia)

Unstable Angina

Obsessive-compulsive

disorder (OCD)

Poor attention

 

Night sweats

Anxious

Poor abstract thinking

 

Urinary frequency

Lack of stability

 

Bone loss

 

Urinary dribbling

Lack of emotional maturity

 

Kidney problems

 

Incomplete emptying of the bladder

Lack of emotional IQ

 

Anemia

 

Premenstrual bleeding

Impulsive

 

Thyroid disorders

 

perimenstrual bleeding

Difficulty Concentrating

 

Digestion problems

 

Excessive menstrual bleeding

Memory problems

 

Joint pain

 

Paresthesia

Not protective of

loved ones

 

Loner

 

Depersonalization

 

"Blue"

 

Derealization

Obsessive compulsive

disorder (OCD)

 

Lack of emotions

 

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

 

Variable attention

 

Fear of people/social events

   

Memory Problems

       

Difficulty Concentrating

       

Procrastinator

       

Hedonistic

       

Dementia 

     Approximately more than 55 million individuals worldwide suffer from dementia[4]. Within the US approximately 5.8 million individuals suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias[5]. Alzheimer's disease accounts for ~60% to 70% of dementia cases[6]. Common early symptoms of dementia include short-term memory loss, repetition, getting lost, difficulties tracking bills, problems with cooking especially new or complicated meals, forgetting to take medication, and word-finding problems[7][4]. Despite the high prevalence of dementia routine screening is typically not done in the majority of the population. This may be further exacerbated by the fact that patients with dementia can have poor insight into their own cognitive function and/or they are embarrassed about their situation. The following checklist relating to dementia allows providers to discuss these issues with their patients in a nonjudgmental way and helps to destigmatize dementia and raise awareness.

     Signs and Symptoms That May Indicate the Need for Evaluation for Dementia

  • Cognitive changes:

          New forgetfulness, more trouble understanding spoken and written communication, difficulty finding words,                  disorientation, not knowing common facts, i.e., name of the current U.S. President

  • Psychiatric symptoms:

         Withdrawal/apathy, depression, suspiciousness, anxiety, insomnia, fearfulness, paranoia, abnormal beliefs,                  hallucinations

  • Personality changes:

        Inappropriate friendliness, blunting and disinterest, social withdrawal, excessive flirtatiousness, easily frustrated,          explosive spells

  • Problem behaviors:

         Wandering, agitation, noisiness, restlessness, being out of bed at night

  • Changes in day-to-day functioning:

        Difficulty driving, getting lost, forgetting recipes when cooking, neglecting self-care, neglecting household                      chores, difficulty handling money, making mistakes at work, trouble with shopping

Symptom Checklist in the Evaluation of Dementia

Impaired Cognition

Impaired Function

Mood

Mental Phenotype

Behaviors

Drives

Memory

Cooking

Depression

Low energy level

Verbal abuse

Poor appetite

Language

Finances

Self-deprecating

Apathetic

Uncooperative

Weight loss

Orientation

Housekeeping

Somatic complaint

Panic

Physically aggressive

Excessive appetite

Writing, reading

Shopping

Crying spells

Labile

"Sundowning"

Hypersexuality

Calculating

Driving

Diurnal variation

Irritable

Demands interaction

Hyposexuality

Recognizing

Attention

Hearing and sight

Dressing

Withdrawn

Anxiety

Euphoria

Delusions

Outbursts

Catastrophic

Sleeping poorly

Excessive sleep

Concentration

Mobility (falls)

Fatigues easily

Illusions

Noisy

Out of bed at night

Planning, organizing

Bathing, grooming

Death, suicidal

Rapid speech

Wandering

 

Personality change

Feeding

Disinterested

Hallucinations

Hoarding, rummaging

 

Executing

Continence

Anhedonia

Acute confusion

Sexual aggression

 

Social rules

     

Intrusive

 

Accidents: Please write down the number of times for each accident if they ever occurred to you.

Accidents

Car

Skiing

Falling

Breaking

Bones

Getting

Hit

Others

Severe

           

Moderate

           

Minor

           

Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion 

   According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1.5 million Americans sustain a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) annually[8]. It is also considered to be one of the leading causes of disability and death within the pediatric population (26 years of age and younger).  Injuries of this nature can have serious short-term and long-term effects on individuals, their families, and society. Short-term consequences may include headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, temporary loss of consciousness, etc. Long-term consequences may involve problems with memory, concentration, verbal communication, impulse control, sleep, etc. In addition, patients may exhibit personality changes or suffer psychological problems, such as depression, suicidal ideation, etc. Despite the prevalence and devastating effects associated with these injuries most physicians do not routinely screen or ask patients during clinical interview about previous head trauma/concussions/TBIs. Therefore, a thorough, repetitive (concussion/TBI histories that are filled out repeatedly at intervals, often leads to better recall and more honest answers), and multipage concussion/head injury questionnaire was created and included below.

Concussion/TBI History

Please answer/circle ANYTHING and EVERYTHING that may apply to you. IT WILL BE MORE BENEFICIAL FOR CARE.

Concussion without loss of consciousness: # of times Date(s)

Concussion with loss of consciousness: # of times Date(s)

Other Head Injury/injuries* (describe): # of times Date(s)

*Please consider any of the following: Blow to head, auto accident, fight, sports injury, fall, other.

Were any of these head injuries/concussions within a four-week period of one another? Include specific dates if possible.

For each concussion or head injury:

Where on the head was the injury?

Did you experience retrograde amnesia (inability to recall short-term memories occurring prior to onset of the injury)? Y/N

Did you experience anterograde amnesia (inability to recall short-term memories occurring after onset of the injury)? Y/N

Did you experience confusion/disorientation? Y / N

Did you experience any noticeable memory decline? Y / N

Did you experience any seizures after the incident? Y / N

Did you experience other symptoms?

Did you go to the hospital? Y / N

Did you undergo a CT scan? Y / N

Did you undergo an MRI? Y / N

Did you undergo EEG? Y / N

If playing sports, did you return to play during the same game/practice?

Behavioral Changes in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

Premonitory (Hours or Days Before Seizure)

Affective (depression, irritability, aggression)

Cognitive (confusion, impaired memory)

Behavioral (withdrawal)

Somatic (headache, change in body temperature, appetite, or thirst)

Simple Partial Symptoms

Sensory (illusions or hallucinations in olfactory, auditory, visual, or gustatory modes)

Autonomic/visceral (rising abdominal feeling, chest sensation, palpitation, piloerection)

Affective (depression, fear, anxiety, elation, laughing, crying, religious or sexual feeling)

Cognitive/experimental (confusion, altered familiarity [déjà vu, jamais vu], dreamy state, depersonalization, forced

thoughts, distortion of time or body image)

Complex Partial Symptoms

Impaired consciousness (blank stare, arrest of ongoing behavior)

Automatisms (lip-smacking, swallowing, fumbling or repetitive movements of hands, repetitive phrases, continuation

of ongoing behavior [e.g., walking, dealing cards])

Dystonic posturing of extremity, usually the hand

Postictal

Headache

Affective (depression, mania, aggression*)

Cognitive (confusion, amnesia, anomia, aphasia)

Psychosis

Interictal

Affective (depression, anxiety, irritability, hypomania, increased or decreased emotionality, aggression)

Cognitive (amnesia, anomia, psychomotor slowing, impaired executive and social functions)

Sexual (reduced libido, impotence, anorgasmia)

Personality (circumstantiality, humorlessness, hypergraphia, hypermoralism, obsessionalism, paranoia, religiosity,

viscosity)

Psychosis

*Usually provoked by restraint.

Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

     Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders that affect children. According to the CDC approximately 6.1 million children (age 5-17)[9], in the United States (US), are affected. Usually, it is diagnosed during childhood, however, sometimes individuals aren’t properly diagnosed until adulthood. Some typical types of symptoms of ADHD include impulsiveness, disorganization, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, low frustration tolerance, restlessness, trouble multitasking, etc. ADHD can persist throughout adulthood and can cause problems for individuals at home, work, or with relationships. Therefore, it is imperative to properly diagnose ADHD early. So, a more thorough questionnaire designed to diagnose ADHD in adults was created and included down below.

The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Symptom Checklist

   

Never

Rarely

Sometimes

Often

Very Often

Score

 

Part A: Inattention

           

1

How often do you make careless mistakes when you have to work on a boring or difficult project?

0

1

2

3

4

 

2

How often do you have difficulty keeping your attention when you are doing boring or repetitive work?

0

1

2

3

4

 

3

How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people say to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?

0

1

2

3

4

 

4*

How often do you have trouble wrapping up the fine details of a project, once the challenging parts have been done?

0

1

2

3

4

 

5*

How often do you have difficulty getting things in order when you have to do a task that requires organization?

0

1

2

3

4

 

6*

When you have a task that requires a lot of thought, how often do you avoid or delay getting started?

0

1

2

3

4

 

7

How often do you misplace or have difficulty finding things at home or at work?

0

1

2

3

4

 

8

How often are you distracted by activity or noise around you?

0

1

2

3

4

 

9*

How often do you have problems remembering appointments or obligations?

0

1

2

3

4

 
 

Part A – Total:

           
               
 

Part B: Hyperactivity-impulsivity

           

10*

How often do you fidget or squirm with your hands or your feet when you have to sit down for a long time?

0

1

2

3

4

 

11

How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?

0

1

2

3

4

 

12

How often do you feel restless or fidgety?

0

1

2

3

4

 

13

How often do you have difficulty unwinding and relaxing when you have time to yourself?

0

1

2

3

4

 

14*

How often do you feel overly active and compelled to do things, like you were driven by a motor?

0

1

2

3

4

 

15

How often do you find yourself talking too much when you are in a social situation?

0

1

2

3

4

 

16

When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people that you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?

0

1

2

3

4

 

17

How often do you have difficulty waiting your turn in situations when turn-taking is required?

0

1

2

3

4

 

18

How often do you interrupt others when they are busy?

0

1

2

3

4

 
 

Part B – Total:

           

Mild Cognitive Domain Assessment 

   Subjective checklists can be useful in diagnosing/screening for certain disorders; however, they are not always the most accurate.  Patients can be unreliable due to lack of awareness, poor historians, neuropsychiatric disturbances, denial, intentional lying, etc.  Therefore, tests that provide objective measurements are also needed to evaluate brain health. Objective measures of a direct brain injury are necessary because they can confirm the severity of head trauma, concussion, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders, medical comorbidities, etc. The MCI Domain Assessment below combines subjective and objective testing. It includes a simple subjective checklist that allows health providers to screen patients for deficits in certain domains i.e., memory, attention, judgement, IQ, etc. If a deficit is reported in one of these categories then the provider can look into the last column to see what possible objective assessments can be used to investigate the deficit further. By identifying these deficits/Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) earlier providers can prevent, slow, and sometimes reverse brain injury.

     There are several objective assessments listed within the MCI Domain Assessment. The Central Nervous System Vital Signs (CNSVS), is a computerized assessment that evaluates memory, attention, simple motor performance, and executive functions. The Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), is a computerized assessment that evaluates an individual's attention while screening for ADHD. Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) is a neuropsychological test designed to measure different types of memory functions. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) is an IQ test that evaluates intelligence and cognitive ability in older adolescents and adults. Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) assesses cognitive function including tests of memory, attention, orientation, language, and visual-spatial skills. General Ability Measure for Adults (GAMA) is a brief assessment that evaluates a person's intellectual ability. Electroencephalography (EEG/P300) is an electrophysiological monitoring method designed to record the brain’s electrical activity. In particular, the P300 wave is an event-related potential that quantifies synaptic speed during an EEG and these measurements are like a stress test of the brain.

MCI Domain Assessment

Complete this form prior to any successful treatment:

What was your baseline assessment of existing deficits?

Have you or anyone close to you noticed declines in any of the following domains? (Since your 20s)

Please check any that apply

 

Domain

Yes

No

For Staff Use - Possible Assessments 

1

Attention

(Deficits indicated by missing stop signs, jumping the gun, slow response time, or inconsistency in the manner of response)

   

TOVA

2

Reaction Time

   

CNSVS, TOVA

3

Judgment

(Ability to make good decisions)

   

CNSVS, TOVA

4

Learning ability

(Understanding concepts or instructions and ability to reason)

   

WMS, CNSVS, WAIS

5

Delayed recall

(Ability to retrieve information a given time period after which it was learned) Types: free (without assistance), cued (with assistance of stimulus or prompt), or serial (recall items/events in order in which they were learned)

   

WMS, CNSVS

6

Linguistic function

(Ability to communicate effectively)

   

MMSE

7

Verbal IQ

(Ability to analyze information and solve language-based problems of a literary, logical, or social type. Understanding relationships between language concepts and performing language analogies and comparisons)

   

WAIS

8

Performance IQ

(Ability to analyze and utilize visual information, such as drawing or completing pictures, manipulating blocks to build structures)

   

WMS III

9

Abstract IQ

(Ability to analyze information and apply knowledge in problem-solving using theories, metaphors, or complex analogies; usually involves forming ideas about the nature of objects, ideas, and processes; problems are often visual and typically do not involve social ideas)

   

GAMA

10

Processing Speed

(How quickly/efficiently the brain processes the information it receives; ability to think and learn quickly)

   

CNSVS,

EEG (P300)

11

Immediate Memory

(A general change in ability to remember things, i.e., shortlists, things from one second to the next, recent events, etc.)

   

WMS, MMSE

12

General Cognitive Functioning

(Ability to think about ideas, analyze situations, and solve problems)

   

CNSVS

   International Classification of Disease (ICD)-10 Codes

Below is a condensed list of common insurance codes for various neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. 

Possible Codes for Insurance Review

D33.2 Benign neoplasm of brain, unspecified

G23.2 Striatonigral degeneration

G47.53 Recurrent isolated sleep paralysis

E05.90 Thyrotoxicosis, unspecified without thyrotoxic crisis or storm

G23.8 Other specified degenerative diseases of basal ganglia

G47.54 Parasomnia in conditions classified elsewhere

E03.9 Hypothyroidism, unspecified

G24.01 Drug induced subacute dyskinesia

G47.59 Other parasomnia

E53.8 Deficiency of other specified B group vitamins

G24.02 Drug induced acute dystonia

G47.61 Periodic limb movement disorder

E88.9 Metabolic disorder, unspecified

G24.1 Genetic torsion dystonia

G47.62 Sleep related leg cramps

F01.50 Vascular dementia without behavioral disturbance

G24.3 Spasmodic torticollis

G47.63 Sleep related bruxism

F01.51 Vascular dementia with behavioral disturbance

G24.4 Idiopathic orofacial dystonia

 G47.69 Other sleep related movement disorders

F03.90 Unspecified dementia without behavioral disturbance

G24.5 Blepharospasm

G47.8 Other sleep disorders

F05 Delirium due to known physiological condition

G24.8 Other dystonia

G80.3 Athetoid cerebral palsy

F06.30 Mood disorder due to known physiological condition, unspecified

G25.0 Essential Tremor

G91.0 Communicating hydrocephalus

F07.0 Personality change due to known physiological condition

G25.3 Myoclonus

G91.1 Obstructive hydrocephalus

F07.81 Postconcussional syndrome

G25.5 Other chorea

G93.0 Cerebral cysts

F10.182 Alcohol abuse with alcohol-induced sleep disorder

G25.69 Other tics of organic origin

G93.1 Anoxic brain damage, not elsewhere classified

F10.231 Alcohol dependence with withdrawal delirium

G25.81 Restless legs syndrome

G93.2 Benign intracranial hypertension

F10.239 Alcohol dependence with withdrawal, unspecified

G25.82 Stiff-man syndrome

G93.40 Encephalopathy, unspecified

F10.282 Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced sleep disorder

G25.83 Benign shuddering attacks

G93.41 Metabolic encephalopathy

F10.96 Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder

G25.89 Other specified extrapyramidal and movement disorders

G93.7 Reye's syndrome

F10.27 Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced persisting dementia

G25.9 Extrapyramidal and movement disorder, unspecified

G94 Other disorders of brain in diseases classified elsewhere

F10.950 Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder with delusions

G30.9 Alzheimer's disease, unspecified

H47.019 Ischemic optic neuropathy, unspecified eye

F10.951 Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations

G31.01 Pick's disease

H47.20 Unspecified optic atrophy

F10.982 Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced sleep disorder

G31.09 Other frontotemporal dementia

H47.239 Glaucomatous optic atrophy, unspecified eye

F10.99 Alcohol use, unspecified with unspecified alcohol-induced disorder

G31.1 Senile degeneration of brain, not elsewhere classified

H46.9 Unspecified optic neuritis

F11.182 Opioid abuse with opioid-induced sleep disorder

G31.83 Dementia with Lewy bodies

H53.16 Psychophysical visual disturbances

F11.282 Opioid dependence with opioid-induced sleep disorder

G31.84 Mild cognitive impairment, so stated

H81.09 Ménière's disease, unspecified ear

F11.982 Opioid use, unspecified with opioid-induced sleep disorder

G31.9 Degenerative disease of nervous system, unspecified

H81.4 Vertigo of central origin

F13.182 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic abuse with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced sleep disorder

G35 Multiple sclerosis

H90.3 Sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral

F13.282 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced sleep disorder

G37.8 Other specified demyelinating diseases of central nervous system

H90.5 Unspecified sensorineural hearing loss

F13.982 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic use, unspecified with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced sleep disorder

G40 Epilepsy and recurrent seizures

H93.19 Tinnitus, unspecified ear

F14.182 Cocaine abuse with cocaine-induced sleep disorder

G40.A01 Absence epileptic syndrome, not intractable, with status epilepticus

J96.00 Acute respiratory failure, unspecified whether with hypoxia or hypercapnia

F14.282 Cocaine dependence with cocaine-induced sleep disorder

G40.A09 Absence epileptic syndrome, not intractable, without status epileptics

J96.10 Chronic respiratory failure, unspecified whether with hypoxia or hypercapnia

F14.982 Cocaine use, unspecified with cocaine-induced sleep disorder

G40.101 Localization-related (focal) (partial) symptomatic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes with simple partial seizures, not intractable, with status epilepticus

J96.20 Acute and chronic respiratory failure, unspecified whether with hypoxia or hypercapnia

F15.182 Other stimulant abuse with stimulant-induced sleep disorder

G40.109 Localization-related (focal) (partial) symptomatic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes with simple partial seizures, not intractable, without status epilepticus

J96.90 Respiratory failure, unspecified, unspecified whether with hypoxia or hypercapnia

F15.282 Other stimulant dependence with stimulant-induced sleep disorder

G40.3 Generalized idiopathic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes

N39.44 Nocturnal enuresis

F15.920 Other stimulant use, unspecified with intoxication, uncomplicated

G40.30 Generalized idiopathic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes, not intractable

M79.7 Fibromyalgia

F19.182 Other psychoactive substance abuse with psychoactive substance-induced sleep disorder

G40.301 Generalized idiopathic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes, not intractable, with status epilepticus

M79.1 Myalgia

F19.282 Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced sleep disorder

G43 Migraine

N52.9 Male erectile dysfunction, unspecified

F19.939 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with withdrawal, unspecified

G44.1 Vascular headache, not elsewhere classified

P28.3 Primary sleep apnea of newborn

F19.950 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with psychoactive substance-induced psychotic disorder with delusions

G47.00 Insomnia, unspecified

R06.00 Dyspnea, unspecified

F19.982 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with psychoactive substance-induced sleep disorder

G47.01 Insomnia due to medical condition

R06.3 Periodic breathing

F19.99 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with unspecified psychoactive substance-induced disorder

G47.09 Other insomnia

R06.09 Other forms of dyspnea

F32 Depressive episode

G47.10 Hypersomnia, unspecified

R06.83 Snoring

F34.0 Cyclothymic disorder

 G47.11 Idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time

R06.89 Other abnormalities of breathing

F34.1 Dysthymic disorder

G47.13 Recurrent hypersomnia

R13.0 Aphagia

F41.1 Generalized anxiety disorder

 G47.14 Hypersomnia due to medical condition

R13.10 Dysphagia, unspecified

F43.0 Acute stress reaction

G47.19 Other hypersomnia

R25.0 Abnormal head movements

F43.12 Post-traumatic stress disorder

 G47.20 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, unspecified type

R25.1 Tremor, unspecified

F44.4 Conversion disorder with motor symptom or deficit

G47.21 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, delayed sleep phase type

R25.2 Cramp and spasm

F44.6 Conversion disorder with sensory symptom or deficit

G47.22 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, advanced sleep phase type

R25.3 Fasciculation

F51.02 Adjustment insomnia

G47.23 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, irregular sleep wake type

R25.9 Unspecified abnormal involuntary movements

F51.01 Primary insomnia

G47.24 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free running type

R40.0 Somnolence

F51.03 Paradoxical insomnia

G47.25 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, jet lag type

R40.1 Stupor

F51.04 Psychophysiologic insomnia

G47.26 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder, shift work type

R41.2 Retrograde amnesia

F51.05 Insomnia due to other mental disorder

G47.27 Circadian rhythm sleep disorder in conditions classified elsewhere

R41.3 Other amnesia

F51.09 Other insomnia not due to a substance or known physiological condition

G47.29 Other circadian rhythm sleep disorder

R48.3 Visual agnosia

F51.11 Primary hypersomnia

G47.30 Sleep apnea, unspecified

S06.890A Other specified intracranial injury without loss of

F51.12 Insufficient sleep syndrome

G47.31 Primary central sleep apnea

T14.90XA Injury, unspecified, initial encounter

F51.13 Hypersomnia due to other mental disorder

G47.32 High altitude periodic breathing

T56.0X4A Toxic effect of lead and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter

F51.19 Other hypersomnia not due to a substance or known physiological condition

G47.33 Obstructive sleep apnea (adult) (pediatric)

T56.1X4A Toxic effect of mercury and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter.

F51.8 Other sleep disorders not due to a substance or known physiological condition

G47.34 Idiopathic sleep related nonobstructive alveolar hypoventilation

T56.3X4A Toxic effect of cadmium and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter

F51.3 Sleepwalking (somnambulism)

G47.35 Congenital central alveolar hypoventilation syndrome

T56.891A Toxic effect of other metals, accidental (unintentional), initial encounter

F81.81 Disorder of written expression

G47.36 Sleep related hypoventilation in conditions classified elsewhere

T57.0X4A Toxic effect of arsenic and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter

F81.89 Other developmental disorders of scholastic skills

G47.37 Central sleep apnea in conditions classified elsewhere

T57.2X4A Toxic effect of manganese and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter

G10 Huntington's disease

G47.411 Narcolepsy with cataplexy

T56.7X4A Toxic effect of beryllium and its compounds, undetermined, initial encounter

G20 Parkinson's disease

G47.429 Narcolepsy without cataplexy

Z77.011 Contact with and (suspected) exposure to lead

G21.0 Malignant neuroleptic syndrome

G47.50 Parasomnia, unspecified

 

G21.19 Other drug induced secondary parkinsonism

G47.51 Confusional arousals

 

G21.8 Other secondary parkinsonism

G47.52 REM sleep behavior disorder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

  1. 2019 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures . Alzheimer's Assocation. Retrieved 2021-11-15
  2. Mental Illness . National Institute of Mental Health. Retrieved 2021-11-15
  3. Alzheimer's Disease and Healthy Aging Data . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Retrieved 2021-11-15
  4. Dementia . World Health Organization. Retrieved 2021-11-15
  5. Minorities and Women Are at Greater Risk for Alzheimer's Disease . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Retrieved 2021-11-15
  6. Jeffrey L. Cummings; Alzheimer Disease. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association 2002, 287, 2335-2338, 10.1001/jama.287.18.2335.
  7. Alistair Burns; Stephen Iliffe; Dementia. BMJ 2009, 338, b75-b75, 10.1136/bmj.b75.
  8. Report to Congress: Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2021-11-15
  9. Data and Statistics About ADHD . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Retrieved 2021-11-15
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