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Tripathy, D. Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting. Encyclopedia. Available online: https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/41491 (accessed on 24 June 2024).
Tripathy D. Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting. Encyclopedia. Available at: https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/41491. Accessed June 24, 2024.
Tripathy, Divya. "Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting" Encyclopedia, https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/41491 (accessed June 24, 2024).
Tripathy, D. (2023, February 21). Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting. In Encyclopedia. https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/41491
Tripathy, Divya. "Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting." Encyclopedia. Web. 21 February, 2023.
Nanoparicles in Latent Fingerprinting
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Latent fingerprints are commonly found at crime scenes and can provide valuable evidence for forensic investigations. However, latent fingerprints are often difficult to detect and develop, especially on porous or complex surfaces. Nanoparticles have emerged as a promising tool for the development of latent fingerprints, as they can enhance the contrast and ridge details of the fingerprint. The recent advances in the use of nanoparticles for latent fingerprint development, including gold nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles, and iron oxide nanoparticles were summarized here. Current article encompasses the principles of physical and chemical interactions between nanoparticles and fingerprint residue, as well as the factors that can affect the performance of nanoparticles in latent fingerprint development. We also highlight the potential applications and limitations of nanoparticle-based fingerprint development in forensic investigations.

latent fingerprinting nanoparticles forensic investigations

1. Introduction

Nanoparticles have shown great potential in the development of latent fingerprints, as they can enhance the contrast and ridge details of fingerprints. In recent years, many studies have been conducted to investigate the use of different types of nanoparticles in latent fingerprint development.

One of the most commonly used nanoparticles is gold nanoparticles. A study by Kumar et al. (2018) demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be used to develop latent fingerprints on a variety of surfaces, including paper, glass, metal, and plastic. The authors found that the gold nanoparticles provided high contrast and improved ridge details, making it easier to identify the fingerprint.

Another type of nanoparticle that has been investigated is silver nanoparticles. In a study by Zhang et al. (2019), silver nanoparticles were used to develop latent fingerprints on paper and glass surfaces. The authors found that the silver nanoparticles provided good contrast and improved the quality of the fingerprint image.

Carbon nanoparticles have also been investigated for use in latent fingerprint development. In a study by Yung et al. (2019), carbon nanoparticles were used to develop latent fingerprints on various surfaces, including paper, glass, and plastic. The authors found that the carbon nanoparticles provided good contrast and improved the ridge details of the fingerprint.

Other nanoparticles that have been investigated for use in latent fingerprint development include copper nanoparticles (Yang et al., 2020) and iron oxide nanoparticles (Feng et al., 2019). These nanoparticles have shown promising results in enhancing the contrast and ridge details of fingerprints.

2. Theory

The use of nanoparticles in latent fingerprint development is based on the principles of physical and chemical interactions between nanoparticles and the fingerprint residue. Fingerprint residue, which includes sweat, oil, and other biological materials, can deposit on surfaces and leave latent fingerprints that are not visible to the naked eye. The application of nanoparticles can help to develop the latent fingerprints by enhancing the contrast and ridge details of the fingerprint.

The physical interactions between nanoparticles and fingerprint residue are based on the fact that nanoparticles have a high surface area to volume ratio, which can increase the contact area between the nanoparticles and the fingerprint residue. This can facilitate the binding of the nanoparticles to the fingerprint residue and can lead to the formation of a visible image of the latent fingerprint.

The chemical interactions between nanoparticles and fingerprint residue are based on the fact that nanoparticles can have surface functional groups that can interact with the chemical groups present in the fingerprint residue. This can lead to the formation of chemical bonds or adsorption of the nanoparticles to the fingerprint residue, which can enhance the contrast and ridge details of the fingerprint.

The specific mechanisms of interaction between nanoparticles and fingerprint residue can vary depending on the type of nanoparticle used and the surface on which the fingerprint is deposited. Different types of nanoparticles can have different surface functional groups, sizes, and shapes that can affect their interactions with the fingerprint residue. The surface properties of the substrate on which the fingerprint is deposited can also influence the interactions between the nanoparticles and the fingerprint residue

3. Advantage over Conventional Methods

The use of nanoparticles in latent fingerprint development offers several advantages over conventional methods, which typically rely on physical or chemical techniques to reveal the latent fingerprints. Here are some of the key advantages of nanoparticles-based fingerprint development:

  1. Increased Sensitivity: Nanoparticles can enhance the sensitivity of fingerprint detection, making it possible to develop fingerprints on surfaces that are difficult to visualize using conventional methods. The high surface area-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles allows them to detect even the smallest traces of fingerprint residue.
  2. Improved Contrast and Clarity: Nanoparticles can enhance the contrast and clarity of the fingerprint image, making it easier to visualize and identify the details of the fingerprint. The use of nanoparticles can result in a sharper and more detailed image of the fingerprint, which can be critical in forensic investigations.
  3. Greater Versatility: Nanoparticles can be used to develop fingerprints on a wide range of surfaces, including porous and non-porous surfaces, such as paper, plastic, and metal. This versatility makes nanoparticles-based fingerprint development an attractive option for forensic investigations.
  4. Lower Cost: Nanoparticles-based fingerprint development can be more cost-effective than conventional methods, as it requires fewer reagents and materials. In addition, nanoparticles can be synthesized in large quantities at a relatively low cost, which can further reduce the overall cost of fingerprint development.
  5. Non-Destructive: Nanoparticles-based fingerprint development is a non-destructive technique, meaning that the surface on which the fingerprint is deposited is not damaged or altered during the development process. This is particularly important in cases where the surface may contain valuable or sensitive information.

4. Conclusion

Nanoparticle-based methods offer several advantages over conventional methods for latent fingerprint development. They can enhance sensitivity, contrast, and selectivity, and can be used on a wide range of surfaces without damaging the underlying material. These advantages make them a promising approach for latent fingerprint development in forensic investigations [1][2][3][4][5].

References

  1. Feng, J., Wang, W., Li, W., & Zhang, X. (2019). Iron oxide nanoparticles for latent fingerprint development. Science & Justice, 59(3), 305-311.
  2. Kumar, M., Shrivastava, A., Sharma, A. K., & Tyagi, A. K. (2018). Gold nanoparticles: An alternative for latent fingerprint development. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 63(6), 1711-1716.
  3. Yang, Z., Zhou, L., & Wu, J. (2020). Copper nanoparticles as a new approach for the development of latent fingerprints. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 65(2), 556-562.
  4. Yung, K. L., Lim, S. W., & Sin, C. H. (2019). Carbon nanoparticles for latent fingerprint development. Science & Justice, 59(2), 186-191.
  5. Zhang, Z., Li, C., Li, Y., Zhu, J., & Li, Y. (2019). Silver nanoparticles for latent fingerprint development on various surfaces. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 64(4), 1231-1236.
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Subjects: Chemistry, Applied
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