Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?
Playlist
  • Principia Mathematic
  • Syrup
  • Swim
  • water
Video Introduction

As early as the 17th century, Newton proposed that "swimming in molasses is slower than in water, because the viscous molasses has greater resistance than water". At the time Newton was writing his Principia Mathematica, which laid down many of the laws of physics. Newton thought that the speed of an object in a fluid depended on its viscosity, while Huygens thought it would not. Their debate remained theoretical. To finally get to the bottom of this question, Edward Cussler of the University of Minnesota and Brian Gettelfinger of the Universities of Minnesota and Wisconsin conducted a careful experiment. [1][2]

References
  1. “Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?” American Institute of Chemical Engineers Journal, Brian Gettelfinger and E. L. Cussler, vol. 50, no. 11, October 2004, pp. 2646-7.
  2. Hopkin, M. Swimming in syrup is as easy as water. Nature (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/news040920-2
Full Transcript
1000/1000

Confirm

Are you sure you want to delete?
Cite
If you have any further questions, please contact Encyclopedia Editorial Office.
Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?. Encyclopedia. Available online: https://encyclopedia.pub/video/video_detail/532 (accessed on 28 January 2023).
Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?. Encyclopedia. Available at: https://encyclopedia.pub/video/video_detail/532. Accessed January 28, 2023.
"Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?," Encyclopedia, https://encyclopedia.pub/video/video_detail/532 (accessed January 28, 2023).
Encyclopedia. (2023, January 12). Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?. In Encyclopedia. https://encyclopedia.pub/video/video_detail/532
''Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?.'' Encyclopedia. Web. 12 January, 2023.
Top
Feedback