Sort:
Show:
Page Size:
Topic review
Updated time: 13 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Michael McAleer
Definition: Many academics are critical of the current publishing system, but it is difficult to create a better alternative. The perspective relates to the sciences and social sciences, and discusses the primary purpose of academic journals as providing a seal of approval for perceived quality, impact, significance, and importance. The key issues considered include the role of anonymous refereeing, continuous rather than discrete frequency of publications, avoidance of time wasting, and seeking adventure. Here we give recommendations about the organization of journal articles, the roles of associate editors and referees, measuring the time frame for refereeing submitted articles in days and weeks rather than months and years, encouraging open access internet publishing, emphasizing the continuity of publishing online, academic publishing as a continuous dynamic process, and how to improve research after publication. Citations and functions thereof, such as the journal impact factor and h-index are the benchmark for evaluating the importance and impact of academic journals and published articles. Even in the very top journals, a high proportion of published articles is never cited, not even by the authors themselves. Top journal publications do not guarantee that published articles will make significant contributions, or that they will ever be highly cited. The COVID-19 world should encourage academics worldwide not only to rethink academic teaching, but also to re-evaluate key issues associated with academic journal publishing in the future.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 13 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Laura Baselga-Pascual
Definition: Systemic Banking crises are a recurrent phenomenon that affects society, and there is a need for a better understanding of the risk factors to support prudential regulation and reduce unnecessary risk intake in the financial system. This paper examines the main bank risk determinants in Latin America. The period analysed covers the timespan from 1999 to 2013, including the systemic banking crisis episodes in Argentina (2001–2003) and Uruguay (2002–2005). We apply a new data-driven comparable methodology to classify and select commercial banks from the sample.
Unfold
Videos
Updated time: 29 Apr 2021
Topic review
Updated time: 30 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Horst Treiblmaier
Definition: Integrating triple bottom line (TBL) goals into supply chains (SCs) is a challenging task which necessitates the careful coordination of numerous stakeholders’ individual interests. Recent technological advancements can impact TBL sustainability by changing the design, structure and management of modern SCs. Blockchain technology enables immutable data records and facilitates a shared data view along the supply chain. The Physical Internet (PI) is an overarching framework that can be applied to create a layered and comprehensive view of the SC. In this conceptual paper I define and combine these technologies and derive several high-level research areas and research questions to investigate adoption, management as well as structural SC issues. I suggest a theory-based research agenda for the years to come that exploits the strengths of rigorous academic research, while remaining relevant for the industry. Furthermore, I suggest various well-established theories to tackle the respective research questions and provide specific directions for future research.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 29 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Anton Miglo
Definition: Capital structure is a firm’s mix of debt and equity financing. It is one of the most controversial areas of finance. Many of the results obtained in capital structure theory over the last 50-60 years have been very influential and led their authors to great international recognition. Among the researchers who contributed significantly to capital structure theory, note Nobel Prize Award winners Franco Modigliani, Merton Miller, Joseph Stiglitz, and most recently Jean Tirole. More research and more results are expected in this area in near future.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 01 May 2021
Submitted by: Thyago Nepomuceno
Definition: The first Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) model developed by Charnes, Cooper and Rhodes (1978) under the assumption of a Constant Returns to Scale production technology, i.e., when an increase in the production resources results in a proportional increase in the output.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 06 Mar 2021
Submitted by: Huichen Jiang
Definition: DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis), as a methodology for the efficiency evaluation of Decision-Making Units (DMUs) with multiple inputs and outputs, is widely used in various areas. The basic idea of DEA is to fit a non-parametric efficient production frontier with DMUs and measure the efficiency relative to the best-performance observations in the sample. In this paper, the China’s listed firms in the automotive industry are seen as the DMUs, and our goal is to measure the efficiency of each DMU and identity the ones that use the inputs more efficiently than the others that have resources over-utilized, namely, the firms can reduce the inputs while the outputs remains constant (input-oriented) rather than the firms can increase the outputs while their inputs remains constant (output-oriented). Therefore, the input-oriented model of DEA is appropriate for our research.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 28 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Todor Tagarev
Definition: The requirements to the governance of collaborative networked organisations (CNOs) can be structured in 33 categories: Geographical Representation or exclusion; Supply chain security; Involvement of external stakeholders; Standards and methodologies; Representation on senior governance bodies; Decision making principles; Auditing; Dispute/conflict management arrangements; Confidentiality & Security; IPR management; Ethics code; Use of slave labour or labour of minors; Green policies; Gender policies and representation; Transparency; Accountability ; Anti-corruption/ integrity policies; Innovation; Adaptiveness; Cohesion; Trust; Sustainability; Resilience; Communication and engagement; Knowledge management; Long-term perspective on collaboration; Interoperability; Leadership; Organisational culture; Competences; Risk management; Evidence-based decision-making; and Competitiveness. As a result of a comprehensive study for CNOs in the field of cybersecurity these governance issues have been structured in two groups (of governance objectives and CNO features) and four tiers in terms of priority. While the governance categories are universally applicable, their prioritisation is relevant for CNOs in the field of cybersecurity.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 26 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Amr ElAlfy
Definition: Amidst a contemporary culture of climate awareness, unprecedented levels of transparency and visibility are dictating industrial organizations to broaden their value chains and deepen the impacts of CSR initiatives. While it may be common knowledge that the 2030 agenda cannot be achieved on a business-as-usual trajectory, this study seeks to determine to what ends the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have impacted Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) research. Highlighting linkages and interdependencies between the SDGs and evolution of CSR practice, this paper analyzes a final sample of 56 relevant journal articles between 2015-2020. With the intent to bridge policy and practice, thematic coding analysis supported the identification and interpretation of key emergent research themes. Using three descriptive categorical classifications (i.e. single-dimension, bi-combination of dimensions, sustainability dimension), the results of this paper provide an in-depth discussion into strategic community, company, consumer, investor, and employee foci. Also, the analysis provides a timely and descriptive overview of how CSR research has approached the SDGs and which are being prioritized. By deepening the understanding of potential synergies between business strategy, global climate agendas, and the common good, this paper contributes to an increased comprehension of how CSR and financial performance can be improved over the long-term.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 29 Oct 2020
Submitted by: Anton Miglo
Definition: Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a newly created firm or project by raising funds from a large number of people. It is usually performed online. In 2009 the volume of funds raised using crowdfunding was negligeably small. Crowdfunding raised $34.4 billion in 2015. Some analysts predict that crowdfunding market size will grow at an annual rate of 27.8% and will surpass venture capital investments in the near future (Miglo and Miglo, 2019).
Unfold
  • Page
  • of
  • 4