Sort:
Show:
Page Size:
Topic review
Updated time: 25 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Miguel Landa-Blanco
Definition: Given their social nature, human beings have a constant need for interacting, cooperating, and communicating with others to work towards the satisfaction of their multiple needs. In this context, activism can be understood as the diversity of behaviors that people exhibit within society and the aim to make problems of social interest visible. Such actions are developed in-person or in digital environments through the internet. These forms of participation are interrelated, and therefore not independent from each other, giving rise to the term “hybrid activism” characterized by the development of integrated actions in both online and offline platforms.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 02 Jul 2021
Submitted by: Obvious Mapiye
Definition: The creation of commercialization opportunities for smallholder farmers has taken primacy on the development agenda of many developing countries. Invariably, most of the smallholders are less productive than commercial farmers and continue to lag in commercialization. Apart from the various multifaceted challenges which smallholder farmers face, limited access to agricultural extension services stands as the underlying constraint to their sustainability.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 10 May 2021
Submitted by: Renata Anibaldi
Definition: Research has a critical role in supporting the implementation of farming practices that are appropriate for meeting food and climate security for a growing global population. Notwithstanding progress towards more sustainable agricultural production, the rate of change varies across and within regions and is, overall, too slow. Understanding what is and is not working at the implementation level and, critically, providing justified explanations on outcomes, is an important contribution of the literature. It is suggested that a greater application of theory in adoption research could increase the contribution of the literature.
Entry Collection : Environmental Sciences
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 16 Jun 2021
Submitted by: Robert Siegel
Definition: Behavioral economics (BE) is a relatively new field within the discipline of economics. It harnesses insights from psychology to improve economic decision making in ways that have the potential to enhance good health and well-being of both individuals and societies, the third of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG). While some of the psychological principles of economic decision-making were described by Adam Smith as early as the 1700s, BE emerged as a discipline in the 1970s because of the groundbreaking work of psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 24 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Elfriede Penz
Definition: Information campaigns and legal regulation are commonly applied tools to effect change of food consumption habits towards carbon-friendly eating patterns. To develop these, businesses and legislators need to identify consumers’ motivational and emotional antecedents for carbon-friendly food consumption practices. The theory of planned behavior (TPB: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control), complemented by positive and negative emotions is suitable to predict carbon-friendly food purchases. It serves as excellent framework to develop recommendations for information campaigns and legislation to foster carbon-friendly food purchases.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 28 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Sandra Waddock
Definition: Transformation catalysts (TCs) are ways of organizing that take catalytic actions to connect, cohere, and amplify the efforts of numerous initiatives oriented towards resolving complex socio-ecological problems like the ones embedded in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. TCs target systems-level solutions by working with narrative to bring about cognitive or paradigm shifts and orient towards systemic change. They take catalytic actions by connecting, cohering, and amplifying the actions of numerous otherwise unconnected actors. TCs use sensemaking processes to problematize and create urgency around key issues, through adopting a systems orientation.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 16 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Ha-Won Jang
Definition: Contact-free services means there is no physical contact between employees and customers, for example kiosks, service robots, and Siren Orders. These services are useful in various fields such as restaurants, cafes, multiplex shopping malls, hospitals, and theaters. In fact, such service methods are made using artificial intelligence (AI) technology and widely used in tourism, hospitality, and various other industries.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 13 May 2021
Submitted by: Jose Ramos
Definition: Continuous innovation has become a key to gaining a sustainable competitive advantage for organizations in the 21st century. Mindfulness and engagement could be characteristic mechanisms of high-quality leader–member exchange (LMX) that helps to facilitate innovation. Practical implications include its creative value in gaining a competitive edge over market competitors and helping organizations to find a sustainable source for their consistent growth through their human capital and innovative potential.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 11 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Sónia Maria Caridade
Definition: The increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and networking has promoted the occurrence of different forms of victimization, specifically in terms of interpersonal interaction (e.g., cyberbullying or online risk-taking behaviour), which also includes cyber dating abuse (CDA). Some studies report that CDA is an extension of offline dating abuse (ODA).
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 29 Jun 2021
Submitted by: Eldon Li
Definition: A successful organization depends primarily on employees' effort, attitude, behavior, and interaction. All these factors are employee-related and play a critical role in accomplishing the organization’s strategy. Scholars have confirmed that employees’ attitudes and behaviors positively influence a firm’s accounting measures and stock returns. Therefore, it is crucial for a firm to entice employees to engage in market orientation behavior (MOB) to attain sustainable competitive advantages and excel at business performance. In the early 1970s, Kotler introduced internal marketing and suggested that a firm should market to its employees before marketing to its customers. Soon after the emergence of this concept, firms began to view jobs as products and employees as internal customers. To be successful, a business must retain talented and competent employees; internal marketing can help businesses resolve this issue. Internal marketing is regarded as a model component of service marketing management and a measurable scale for empirical research.
Unfold
  • Page
  • of
  • 4