Sort:
Show:
Page Size:
Topic review
Updated time: 23 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Bruno Sousa
Definition: Academic tourism is an important opportunity for the tourism industry and for the growth of academic knowledge. Thus, the continued growth of academic tourism has provided opportunities for tour operators, as well as for educational service providers, so that students have become a potential source of long-term investments for destinations. In addition, transport and mobility opportunities in tourist destinations are extremely relevant for academic tourism, especially as a result of the fact that transport can be considered as a primary factor in tourism. More specifically, the unavailability of transport will negatively affect the image of a particular tourist destination, which will, therefore, lead to a reduction in the likelihood that that destination will be visited again.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 23 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Ladan Rokni
Definition: Green-space exposure can play a crucial role in promoting the health and wellbeing of people. Agritourism is a unique ‘experience’ or ‘activity’ that can allow urban dwellers to participate and reconnect to nature through agriculture on a working farm. Moreover, visiting rural green spaces gives a chance to forget the hectic urban life; it allows the tourist to focus on their own and society’s general wellbeing. Agritourism activities can provide the feel of connection with nature and offer visitors the nostalgia of a “quiet” traditional life. Visiting agritourism sites and engaging in the associated activities can improve the perceived immediate mood. In addition, perceived wellbeing might contribute to such immediate mood-boosting.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 28 Jul 2021
Submitted by: Paulo Rita
Definition: Small Island Developing States (SIDS) depend on the tourism industry as an important source for their Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Indeed, tourism is seen as a viable and sometimes the only means of economic growth, job creation, and earnings. Lack of studies was found both in SIDS, including Cape Verde, in regard to analyzing customers perception and satisfaction, and even more so when considering online reviews as a proxy of tourism experience.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 17 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Hugo Padrón-Ávila
Definition: A carbon footprint is “a measure of the exclusive total amount of carbon dioxide emissions that is directly and indirectly caused by the activities of an individual or is accumulated over the life stages of a product”.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 22 Sep 2021
Definition: Geotourism is a form of nature tourism that provides a more immersive experience by exploring the geological richness of the destination. In their natural form or explored as thermal springs and spas, landscape elements and geological formations offer visitors a richer and more holistic experience.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 26 Jul 2021
Submitted by: Fan Cheong
Definition: Green casino hotels refer to casino hotels where managers adopt environmental strategies (or so-called "green strategies") in their operations. At the same time, provide customers with green products and services.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 17 Jun 2021
Submitted by: Seokho Han
Definition: Augmented reality (AR) provides a multidimensional environment that overlays digital contents on a real environment, allowing visitors to see and receive information while preserving the original state of the site. Experiential value refers to interactions that involved the direct usage or distant appreciation of products and services. A true relationship exists between a tourism destination and AR if the integration of AR into a site exerts a holistic effect on travelers. In this regard, the experiential value of AR is considered important because it relies on the value obtained from the interaction between an individual using AR technology and a dynamic experience element. Therefore, the experiential value of AR in heritage tourism can be a salient antecedent to visitors' perception of new technologies and destinations and their future intentions and behavior.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 31 Aug 2021
Submitted by: Víctor Yepes
Definition: Marinas are known to be features related to nautical tourism. It has been defined as a port used exclusively or primarily by pleasure boats, providing services for such boats and their users, and allowing the establishment of a transit between water and land in terms of comfort. Whilst commercial ports are designed to make the port stay of the vessels shorter, marinas are conceived for leisure; therefore, the provision of a pleasant stay is attempted, seeking for a character of permanence more than the mere transit of boats and crews.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 28 Jul 2021
Definition: Ecotourism development is a distinct market phenomenon and a necessary form of sustainable tourism, which grows three times faster than tourism in general. Ecotourism’s rising popularity worldwide has encouraged tourist destinations to receive more and more tourists who like contact with nature and are willing to comply with the protection standards of the natural area chosen.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 23 Sep 2021
Submitted by: Fabien Bourlon
Definition: Scientific tourism (ST) is a transversal approach to tourism development and management that can be applied in the evolution of many segments, from rural, to ecotourism or mass tourism. ST focuses on contributing to the resilience of communities and territories by building shared knowledge and understanding of essential socio-ecological characteristics and dynamics. The website of the ST network (scientific-tourism.org), defines ST as an activity where visitors participate in the generation and dissemination of scientific knowledge being developed by research and development centers. Mao and Bourlon described ST using a spectrum of levels and thematic approaches, organized around the four overarching categories: (1) adventure tourism with a scientific dimension, (2) cultural tourism with a scientific dimension, (3) scientific eco-volunteering, and (4) scientific research-based tourism. The authors suggested that, in many cases, the four forms of ST were complementary, and could simultaneously occur or merge within the scope of a destination or project. While this approach to ST incorporates many of the concepts of learning tourism, it differs in that it is grounded in the perspective of scientific knowledge generation and dissemination. Scientific tourism (ST) development builds on the scientific heritage of a geography, by matching researchers with local actors in an ongoing process that leads to shared understanding and the creation of new knowledge that can support the conservation and resilience of communities and their natural and socio-cultural settings. Through purposeful grounding of tourism in science, local communities can become more engaged with the socio-ecological systems in which they live and become empowered to innovate the ways in which tourism evolves.
Unfold
  • Page
  • of
  • 2