Sort:
Show:
Page Size:
Topic review
Updated time: 21 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Berardino Vaira
Definition: H. pylori is a “fastidious” microorganism; culture methods are time-consuming and technically challenging. The advent of molecular biology techniques has enabled the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotypic resistance to antibiotics in H. pylori.
Entry Collection : Gastrointestinal Disease
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 25 Mar 2021
Submitted by: ISAAC BALDWIN
Definition: The 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion (Burnside-Butler) syndrome is emerging as the most common cytogenetic finding in patients with neurodevelopmental or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presenting for microarray genetic testing. Clinical findings in Burnside-Butler syndrome include developmental and motor delays, congenital abnormalities, learning and behavioral problems, and abnormal brain findings. To better define symptom presentation, we performed comprehensive cognitive and behavioral testing, collected medical and family histories, and conducted clinical genetic evaluations. The 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region includes theTUBGCP5,CYFIP1,NIPA1, andNIPA2genes. To determine if additional genomic variation outside of the 15q11.2 region influences expression of symptoms in Burnside-Butler syndrome, whole-exome sequencing was performed on the parents and affected children for the first time in five families with at least one parent and child with the 15q1l.2 BP1-BP2 deletion. In total, there were 453 genes with possibly damaging variants identified across all of the affected children. Of these, 99 genes had exclusively de novo variants and 107 had variants inherited exclusively from the parent without the deletion. There were three genes (APBB1,GOLGA2, andMEOX1) with de novo variants that encode proteins evidenced to interact with CYFIP1. In addition, one other gene of interest (FAT3) had variants inherited from the parent without the deletion and encoded a protein interacting with CYFIP1. The affected individuals commonly displayed a neurodevelopmental phenotype including ASD, speech delay, abnormal reflexes, and coordination issues along with craniofacial findings and orthopedic-related connective tissue problems. Of the 453 genes with variants, 35 were associated with ASD. On average, each affected child had variants in 6 distinct ASD-associated genes (x¯= 6.33, sd = 3.01). In addition, 32 genes with variants were included on clinical testing panels from Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) approved and accredited commercial laboratories reflecting other observed phenotypes. Notably, the dataset analyzed in this study was small and reported results will require validation in larger samples as well as functional follow-up. Regardless, we anticipate that results from our study will inform future research into the genetic factors influencing diverse symptoms in patients with Burnside-Butler syndrome, an emerging disorder with a neurodevelopmental behavioral phenotype.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 25 Mar 2021
Submitted by: Fabio Cattaneo
Definition: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important regulators of cardiac function and are commonly targeted for medical therapeutics. Formyl-Peptide Receptors (FPRs) belong to the GPCR superfamily and include three members (FPR1, FPR2 and FPR3). FPRs are functionally expressed in several cells and tissues where they can significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders, cancer, infections and cardiovascular pathologies. FPRs stimulation induces phosphorylation of several signaling proteins modulating different cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, intracellular communication, migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and survival. FPRs can also modulate oxidative stress through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production whose dysregulation has been observed in different cardiovascular diseases.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 15 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Gaskon Ibarretxe
Definition: Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are some of the most promising stem cell types for regenerative therapies given their high ability differentiate to neural and vascular lineage cells, their growth in animal serum-free media, their secretion of neuroprotective factors and extracellular vesicles, their high resistance to hypoxia/ischemia, their immunomodulatory properties, and their wide range of possibilities to be used in autologous grafts.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 01 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Dirk Reinhardt
Definition: Acute myeloid leukemia is a life-threatening malignant disorder arising in a complex and dysregulated microenvironment that, in part, promotes the leukemogenesis. Treatment of relapsed and refractory AML, despite the current overall success rates in management of pediatric AML, remains a challenge with limited options considering the heavy but unsuccessful pretreatments in these patients.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 18 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Yohan Jang
Definition: To induce broadly protective immune responses by vaccination, various strategies using live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) and novel vaccine platforms are under investigation. Despite superior cross-protection ability, very little attention has been paid to LAIVs for the development of UIV.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 22 Mar 2021
Submitted by: Suban Sahoo
Definition: Mercury (Hg), this non-essential heavy metal released from both industrial and natural sources entered into living bodies, and cause grievous detrimental effects to the human health and ecosystem.
Unfold
Videos
Updated time: 26 Mar 2021
Submitted by: Lily Guo
Entry Collection : MedlinePlus
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 22 Apr 2021
Submitted by: Byron Baron
Definition: Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies which has quite a high mortality rate. Despite the advances made in CRC treatment, effective therapy is still quite challenging, particularly due to resistance arising throughout the treatment regimen. Several studies have been carried out to identify CRC chemoresistance mechanisms, with research showing different signalling pathways, certain ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), among others to be responsible for the failure of CRC chemotherapies. In the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that certain non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families are involved in chemoresistance. Research investigations have demonstrated that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs) contribute towards promoting resistance in CRC via different mechanisms. Considering the currently available data on this phenomenon, a better understanding of how these ncRNAs participate in chemoresistance can lead to suitable solutions to overcome this problem in CRC.
Unfold
Topic review
Updated time: 31 Mar 2021
Submitted by: Fernando Carton
Definition: The global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing every year and represents a great cost for public healthcare systems, as the majority of these diseases are progressive. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new therapies. Oligonucleotide-based drugs are emerging as novel and promising alternatives to traditional drugs. Their expansion corresponds with new knowledge regarding the molecular basis underlying CKD, and they are already showing encouraging preclinical results, with two candidates being evaluated in clinical trials. However, despite recent technological advances, efficient kidney delivery remains challenging, and the presence of off-targets and sideeffects precludes development and translation to the clinic.
Unfold
  • Page
  • of
  • 2