Topic Review
Integrated Archaeological Database
The Integrated Archaeological Database system, or IADB for short, is an open-source web-based application designed to address the data management requirements throughout the lifespan of archaeological excavation projects, from initial excavation recording, through post-excavation analysis and research to eventual dissemination and archiving.
  • 30
  • 04 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Biblical Software
Biblical software or Bible software is a group of computer applications designed to read, study and in some cases discuss biblical texts and concepts. Biblical software programs are similar to e-book readers in that they include digitally formatted books, may be used to display a wide variety of inspirational books and Bibles, and can be used on portable computers. However, biblical software is geared more toward word and phrase searches, accessing study bible notes and commentaries, referencing various modern translations, cross-referencing similar passages and topics, biblical dictionaries, original language texts and language tools, maps, charts, and other e-books deemed relevant to understanding texts from a philological approach. Bible software varies in complexity and depth, depending on the needs of users, just as the purposes of the users vary from devotional reading and personal study to lesson and sermon preparation, inspirational publishing and even further research tools and translations. Basic Bible software is typically aimed at mobile phones, and is designed to simply display the text of a single Bible translation, with word and phrase searches as the only available tool. More advanced packages run on personal computers and boast far more features, display a wider variety of theological resources (see above), and may offer features such as synopses and harmonies of the Gospel narratives, morphological and syntactical searches of original texts, sentence diagramming, user notes, manual and dynamic highlighting, lectionary viewers, etc.
  • 31
  • 04 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Optical Fiber Sensors and Sensing Networks
Optical fiber sensors present several advantages in relation to other types of sensors. These advantages are essentially related to the optical fiber properties, i.e., small, lightweight, resistant to high temperatures and pressure, electromagnetically passive, among others. Sensing is achieved by exploring the properties of light to obtain measurements of parameters, such as temperature, strain, or angular velocity. In addition, optical fiber sensors can be used to form an Optical Fiber Sensing Network (OFSN) allowing manufacturers to create versatile monitoring solutions with several applications, e.g., periodic monitoring along extensive distances (kilometers), in extreme or hazardous environments, inside structures and engines, in clothes, and for health monitoring and assistance.
  • 95
  • 03 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Saturn Launch Vehicle Digital Computer
The Saturn Launch Vehicle Digital Computer (LVDC) was a computer that provided the autopilot for the Saturn V rocket from launch to Earth orbit insertion. Designed and manufactured by IBM's Electronics Systems Center in Owego, N.Y., it was one of the major components of the Instrument Unit, fitted to the S-IVB stage of the Saturn V and Saturn IB rockets. The LVDC also supported pre- and post-launch checkout of the Saturn hardware. It was used in conjunction with the Launch Vehicle Data Adaptor (LVDA) which performed signal conditioning to the sensor inputs to the computer from the launch vehicle.
  • 51
  • 02 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Smart Parking Management Systems
Urbanization, which causes the need for population mobility, leads to an increase in motorization and related problems: the organization of parking spaces in cities, both near work places and recreational spaces, and not far from residential locations. This has a number of consequences. Therefore, the occupation of parking spaces near shopping centers and sports and recreation facilities, intended only for customers of these organizations, makes it difficult for direct customers to access services. This forces potential customers to look for a parking space in adjacent areas, often far from the target location. At the same time, the search for a parking space is stretched over time, negatively affecting the environment in the form of emissions and noise. On the other hand, there is a risk of losing a client. Using simulation models to find rational options for the organization of access to parking spaces and further using such models in decision support systems (DSS) as an intellectual core may solve this problem. 
  • 81
  • 02 Nov 2022
Topic Review
Bionic
Bionic is an implementation of the standard C library, developed by Google for its Android operating system. It differs from the GNU C Library (glibc) in being designed for devices with less memory and processor power than a typical Linux system. It is a combination of new code and code from FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD released under a BSD license, rather than glibc, which uses the GNU Lesser General Public License. This difference was important in the early days of Android, when static linking was common, and is still helpful in introducing Android to software companies used to proprietary operating systems, who can be wary of the LGPL, and unclear about the differences between it and the full GNU General Public License (GPL). Bionic is a C library for use with the Linux kernel, and provides libc, libdl, and libm (libpthread functionality is part of libc, not a separate library as on some other systems). This differs from the BSD C libraries that bionic shares code with, because they require a BSD kernel.
  • 33
  • 30 Oct 2022
Topic Review
Traffic Flow Prediction Based on MLR-LSTM Neural Network
A prediction method based on the combination of multiple linear regression and Long-Short-Term Memory (MLR-LSTM) is proposed, which uses the incomplete traffic flow data in the past period of time of the target prediction section and the continuous and complete traffic flow data in the past period of time of each adjacent section to jointly predict the traffic flow changes of the target section in a short time.
  • 28
  • 27 Oct 2022
Topic Review
List of Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction Tools
This list of protein subcellular localisation prediction tools includes software, databases, and web services that are used for protein subcellular localization prediction. Some tools are included that are commonly used to infer location through predicted structural properties, such as signal peptide or transmembrane helices, and these tools output predictions of these features rather than specific locations. These software related to protein structure prediction may also appear in lists of protein structure prediction software.
  • 21
  • 18 Oct 2022
Topic Review
Lazarus
Lazarus is a free cross-platform visual integrated development environment (IDE) for rapid application development (RAD) using the Free Pascal compiler. Its goal is to provide an easy-to-use development environment for programmers developing with the Object Pascal language, which is as close as possible to Delphi. Software developers use Lazarus to create native-code console and graphical user interface (GUI) applications for the desktop, and also for mobile devices, web applications, web services, visual components and function libraries for a number of different platforms, including Mac, Linux and Windows. A project created by using Lazarus on one platform can be compiled on any other one which Free Pascal compiler supports. For desktop applications a single source can target Mac OS, Linux, and Windows, with little or no modification. An example is the Lazarus IDE itself, created from a single code base and available on all major platforms including the Raspberry Pi.
  • 41
  • 17 Oct 2022
Topic Review
Lazarus (IDE)
Lazarus is a free cross-platform visual integrated development environment (IDE) for rapid application development (RAD) using the Free Pascal compiler. Its goal is to provide an easy-to-use development environment for programmers developing with the Pascal Object language, which is as close as possible to Delphi. Software developers use Lazarus to create native-code console and graphical user interface (GUI) applications for the desktop, and also for mobile devices, web applications, web services, visual components and function libraries for a number of different platforms, including Mac, Linux and Windows. An application created using Lazarus on one platform can generally compile and execute on any platform for which a Free Pascal compiler exists. For desktop applications a single source can target Mac, Linux, and Windows, with little or no modification. An example is the Lazarus IDE itself, created from a single code base and available on all major platforms including the Raspberry Pi.
  • 301
  • 30 Sep 2022
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