Topic review

Antiviral activity of short peptides against dengue virus

Subjects: Virology
Created by: Hussin Rothan

Dengue virus is a member of the Flaviviridae family and transmitted by mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. Dengue virus infects 50-100 million people worldwide each year and causes various clinical symptoms such as dengue fever (DF) that may later develop to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Dengue virus broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. Short cationic peptides have been considered as the best drug leads for designing and developing new antiviral therapeutics. The main reason for the interest in these peptides is that they possess high specificity and selectivity in their interactions and this ultimately reduces the possible side effects and maximizes the potencies of action.

Antiviral activity of short peptides against dengue virus

Hussin Rothan

Dengue virus is a member of the Flaviviridae family and transmitted by mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. Dengue virus infects 50-100 million people worldwide each year and causes various clinical symptoms such as dengue fever (DF) that may later develop to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS)[1,2]. Annually, there are approximately 0.5 million cases of DHF and DSS that lead to more than 20,000 deaths worldwide[3]. The severe syndromes caused by dengue infection translate to a serious economic burden in more than 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries. Moreover, countries plagued with the dengue virus epidemic are mostly classified by the World Bank as low-income countries. In view of that, there is an increased interest globally in developing new inexpensive vaccines and drugs as well as diagnostic tests that can be used for clinical management, and this would also be seen as a significant increase in the current support for new neglected tropical diseases technologies.

Short cationic peptides have been considered as the best drug leads for designing and developing new antiviral therapeutics[4]. The main reason for the interest in these peptides is that they possess high specificity and selectivity in their interactions and this ultimately reduces the possible side effects and maximizes the potencies of action. Previous studies reported significant inhibition of viral entry by synthetic peptides designed to target the last stage of virus fusion. Our previous studies showed that the antimicrobial cationic peptides like Protegrin-1 (PG1) have been shown to inhibit the dengue NS2B-NS3pro that in turn impairs viral replication in the host cells[5]. One of the main hindrances for the successful production of these peptides using chemical synthesis is the high costs involved and is currently deemed uneconomic especially to achieve the required volumes for epidemic response. As an alternative, the production of these peptides in recombinant form would be cost-effective if a suitable expression system is established to be scalable and well suited for mass production of bioactive peptides[6-9].

References

  1. Yudhishdran J, Navinan R, Ratnatilaka A, Jeyalakshmy S (2014) Dengue haemorrhagic fever presenting with cholestatic hepatitis: two case reports and a review of literature. BMC Res Notes 7: 568.
  2. Shekhar KC, Senan P (1992) Epidemiology of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia. III. A comparative study of clinical features seen in virologically confirmed cases for periods between 1963-1987--a review. J Singapore Paediatr Soc 34: 67-82.
  3. George R (1987) Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia: a review. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 18: 278-283.
  4. Rothan HA, Mohamed Z, Suhaeb AM, Rahman NA, Yusof R (2013) Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide. OMICS 17: 560-567.
  5. Rothan HA, Abdulrahman AY, Sasikumer PG, Othman S, Rahman NA, et al. (2012) Protegrin-1 inhibits dengue NS2B-NS3 serine protease and viral replication in MK2 cells. J Biomed Biotechnol 2012: 251482.
  6. Rothan HA, Han HC, Ramasamy TS, Othman S, Rahman NA, et al. (2012) Inhibition of dengue NS2B-NS3 protease and viral replication in Vero cells by recombinant retrocyclin-1. BMC Infect Dis 12: 314.
  7. Rothan HA, Bahrani H, Rahman NA, Yusof R (2014) Identification of natural antimicrobial agents to treat dengue infection: In vitro analysis of latarcin peptide activity against dengue virus. BMC Microbiol 14: 140.
  8. Rothan HA, Bahrani H, Mohamed Z, Abd Rahman N, Yusof R (2014) Fusion of protegrin-1 and plectasin to MAP30 shows significant inhibition activity against dengue virus replication. PLoS One 9: e94561.
  9. Rothan HA, Bahrani H, Shankar EM, Rahman NA, Yusof R (2014) Inhibitory effects of a peptide-fusion protein (Latarcin-PAP1-Thanatin) against chikungunya virus. Antiviral Res 108: 173-180.

 

Cite this article

HUSSIN, ROTHAN. Antiviral activity of short peptides against dengue virus, Encyclopedia, 2020, v1, Available online: https://encyclopedia.pub/514